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Sea Vixen wheels-up landing at RNAS Yeovilton

Navy Wings Sea Vixen (G-CVIX XP924) suffered hydraulic issues and made a wheels-up landing at RNAS Yeovilton on Saturday 27th May 2017. The pilot, Cdr Simon Hargreaves performed a highly controlled wheels-up landing and is safe and well.

The World's only flying Sea Vixen had completed its display at the Duxford Air Festival which took place on Saturday 27th May and returned to its home base at Yeovilton.

Post accident processes are currently being carried out.

The Sea Vixen is an iconic all-British twin-boom, twin-turbojet fighter that flew from Royal Navy aircraft carriers at the height of the Cold War in the 1960s and 70s, helping to transform the nation's carrier aviation capability. She was one of the UK's most notable aircraft designs of the time, with cutting edge technology and the capability to go transonic. The Vixen was the first British aircraft to be armed with guided missiles, rockets and bombs instead of guns and was formidably capable.

With power-folding swept wings and hinged nose-cone, she epitomised the radical and innovative thinking of British engineers and designers of the time, whose designs overcame the challenges of operating the UK's all-weather interceptor at sea, day and night.

Today, Sea Vixen G-CVIX XP924 is the only flying Sea Vixen in the world. Based at RNAS Yeovilton and flying in 899 Naval Air Squadron colours from HMS Eagle, she plays a key role in the story of the evolution of the nation's carrier aviation heritage.

Scott Dabinett facebook Photos.

Sea Vixen G-CVIX XP924 update:

Charity Appeals for White Knight

Following the emergency landing of Sea Vixen G-CVIX XP924 at RNAS Yeovilton on 27 May 17, Navy Wings is urgently seeking a 'white knight' sponsor to save the aircraft and restore this unique and nationally important naval heritage fighter to full flying condition.

Unfortunately the structural damage to the airframe is more serious than first thought. This includes cracks on both tail booms, warping of the main bulk heads in the engine compartment and major damage to the gear box. The important factor here was speed of landing. The Sea Vixen suffered a major hydraulic failure of both systems and the pilot, Commander Simon Hargreaves was unable to lower the flaps along with the under-carriage. This necessitated a high speed, low angle run on and the energy transferred itself through the airframe.

Work by Assessors estimate that it could take between 3-4 years and cost £2-3M to get her flying again. A white knight is needed in the next month who would be prepared to come to the rescue and under-write these costs and save the last flying Sea Vixen in the world, recognising her uniqueness and value to the Nation's naval aviation heritage.

Sea Vixen Appeal